Metals and Industrial Raw Materials

Acting synergically with Mining, Re-melting, Die-casting, Traders, Suppliers and other metal-processing sectors.


ALUMINIUM : HISTORY & ETYMOLOGY

Aluminium (meaning "bitter salt" in Latin; called Aluminum in the USA) is a bright-silver-coloured non-ferrous metal with characteristics of softness, ductility, durability conductivity and non-magnetism. Aluminium (chemical symbol Al) is after Oxygen and Silicon the third element on Earth in terms of abundance, the most abundant metal in the Earth's crust (composing about 8% of its mass) and the most-widely used non-ferrous metal.

ALUMINIUM ALLOYS & RECYCLING

Aluminium is almost always alloyed with other metals to improve its mechanical properties and multiply its strength. Aluminium alloys are vital to the Automotive, Aerospace and Construction industries especially. Other fields of application are Food, Household, Lighting, Electronics, Pyrotechnics, etc.


COPPER : HISTORY & ETYMOLOGY

Copper (from the latin word "cuprum") is a soft, malleable, ductile and highly conductive metal. Its name is given to the fact the metal was principally mined in Cyprus (aes cyprium) in the Roman era. With its symbol Cu and its characteristic red-orange colour, Copper was the first metal to be used by men (over 10000 years ago) and the first to be alloyed with another metal to create Bronze (more than 5000 years ago).

COPPER PRODUCTION & RECYCLING

Chile is the major producer of Copper with one-third of the global share (over 15 million tonnes per year), and its demand is in continuous growth. The extraction of Copper at the current rate is still worth about 5 million years. Despite that, Copper recycling is a major source in modern markets.


GRAPHITE ELECTRODE : FACTS

Graphite electrode, mainly from the domestic petroleum coke and needle coke, is widely used in electric arc furnace, ladle furnace, submerged arc electric furnace for the production of alloy steel, metal and non-metallic materials. Our graphite electrodes include regular power, high power, super high power and ultra-high power. They are characterized by low resistivity, good electric and thermal conductivity, high resistance to oxidation and thermal shock, high mechanical strength, etc. We supply various dimensions and grades to meet customers’ requirements for the specific applications.

APPLICATIONS OF GRAHHITE ELECTRODE:

Widely used in electric arc furnace and ladle refining furnace for steel making, also used in the electric smelting furnace for producing pure silicon, yellow phosphorus, copper matte, calcium carbide and so on. Widely used in the electrical resistance furnace for glass melting, silicon carbide making, graphite product manufacturing, etc.


LEAD : HISTORY & ETYMOLOGY

Lead is a soft, malleable and heavy metal with symbol Pb (from the Latin word plumbum) and a dull grayish color when exposed to air, while it burns with a bluish-white flame. Lead has the highest atomic number of any stable non-radioactive element: Lead-208 is the heaviest known stable nuclide. Lead has been commonly used for thousands of years for being widespread, easy to extract, highly malleable and easily smeltable.

APPLICATIONS OF LEAD:

World resources of lead exceed 2 billion tons, with massive presence in Australia, China, Ireland, Mexico, Peru, etc. With its high density, softness, ductility, malleability, poor electrical conductivity and high resistance to corrosion, Lead is nowadays used in construction, batteries, bullets and firearms, weights, radiation shields, etc.


ZINC : HISTORY & ETYMOLOGY

Zinc is a metal with symbol Zn, with low toughness and high malleability, but highly resistant to impacts and moderately conductive. Alchemists burned Zinc in air to form what they called "philosopher's wool" or "white snow". The element was probably named by the alchemist Paracelsus after the German word Zinke (prong, tooth). Zinc alloy handcrafts have been dated back to 500 B.C., and even 2-3 centuries earlier Zinc was already used together with Copper to produce Brass.

ZINC PRODUCTION & USE

The main countries mining Zinc are China, Peru, Australia, the United States and Canada, for a total volume of almost 15 million metric tonnes per year. Zinc is primarily used in order in galvanisation, to protect Steel against corrosion. Alloys produced with the use of Zinc, such as Brass, are applied in such manufactures as stainless marine components and musical instruments


MANGANESE : HISTORY & ETYMOLOGY

Manganese is a silvery-gray metal that resembles iron. Its name comes from Magnesia, the same Greek region giving names to other materials like Magnesium and Magnetite. Manganese compounds were used by Egyptian and Roman glassmakers to add or remove color from glass. With its symbol Mn, Manganese is the 12th most abundant element on the Earth's crust, and it is difficult to fuse, easy to oxidize, and paramagnetic.

MANGANESE: HISTORY & PRODUCTION

The iron ores used in Ancient Greece to produce war tools led to the conviction that their Manganese content was able to make the Spartan Steel exceptionally hard. Despite some estimations state the ocean floor has 500 billion tonnes of Manganese nodules, viable Manganese resources are way smaller and irregularly distributed, with about 80% of the known world Manganese resources located in South Africa (over 3 million tonnes yearly).


MAGNESIUM : HISTORY & ETYMOLOGY

Magnesium is a shiny gray metal with symbol Mg, covering the place of ninth most abundant element in the universe and making almost 15% of the Earth's mass. Magnesium is mainly produced due to stars' chemical reactions and burns with a characteristic brilliant-white light. The name of Magnesium originates from the Greek district called Magnesia.

MAGNESIUM PRODUCTION & USE

Magnesium global reserves are about 50 times smaller than Aluminium ones, and approximately 80% of Magnesium is produced in China (almost 700.000 tonnes a year), followed by USA which currently holds a 7% share, after a history as a dominant supplier that lasted until the late nineties.


SILICON : HISTORY & ETYMOLOGY

Silicon is a metalloid with symbol Si. It was first isolated as a pure element at the beginning of XIV Century, and its name was created from the Latin "silex" (hard stone). Over 90% of the Earth's crust is composed of silicate minerals, making Silicon the second most abundant element in the Earth's crust (about 28%). Most Silicon is used commercially without being separated, and often with little processing of the natural minerals.

SILICON: PROPERTIES & USE

Aluminium-Silicon alloys (called Silumin Alloys) are heavily used in the Aluminium alloy casting industry, where Silicon is the most important additive to Aluminium improving its casting properties. Since Aluminium castings are widely used in the automobile industry, this application is thus the largest industrial use (about 55% of the total) of "metallurgical grade" pure Silicon.


TIN INGOTS : HISTORY & ETYMOLOGY

Tin is a silvery-white, malleable metal, hard to oxidise. Its symbol is Sn (from Latin: stagnum), and it used to be called plumbum candidum (white Lead) in ancient times. Tin melts at a low temperature of about 232 °C (450 °F) and also for this reason over 50% of it is used today in solder.

TIN: FACTS ABOUT TRADE

Most of the world's Tin is traded on the London Metal Exchange, and prices are affected by International Tin Council's decisions since 1956. Tin is unique for the complex agreements that have characterised its trade in the last 100 years.


HEAVY MELTING STEEL HMS1 / HMS2

HMS 1 consists of heavy melting steel scrap containing no galvanized or blackened steel and having a minimum thickness of 1/4 inch.

HMS 2 consists of heavy melting steel scrap containing galvanized or blackened steel, having a minimum thickness of 1/8 inch.


USED RAILS TRACKS

We, provide the product of unsuitable rails to be good tracks for trains and did not pass the tests of conformity of measurements due to the different sizes and inequalities.

They are thus not suitable for installation as a train track. So we cut it into multiple sizes.